Dignity

What the financial crisis still rocking the world has taken from many middle and lower income people is not only their livelihoods, savings, or pensions, but their dignity. The Greek sovereign debt crisis has many causes, not the least of which are the structural weaknesses inherent in the European Union being an economic union but not a political union. The role of financial speculators such as Goldman Sachs has not been discussed in much depth in the mainstream corporate media, but its influences are without a doubt being felt along with the austerity imposed by the banking giants in Europe futilely, it would appear, trying to hold the EU together. If recent reports are correct, that will be increasingly difficult as the countries that make up that bloc retrench and weather the crisis that has yet to subside for a great many of the world’s people.

For one pensioner in Athens, the austerity imposed upon Greece by foreign creditors proved the last straw. Dimitris Christoulas , a retired 77 years old pharmacist took his own life in Syntagma Square in the center of Athens leaving the following note describing his actions:

In translation:

The collaborationist Tsolakoglou government has annihilated my ability  for my survival, which was based on a very dignified pension that I alone (without any state sponsoring) paid for 35 years.

Since my advanced age does not allow me a way of a dynamic reaction (although if a fellow Greek was to grab a Kalashnikov, I would be the second after him), I see no other solution than this dignified end to my life, so I don’t find myself fishing through garbage cans for my sustenance.

I believe that young people with no future, will one day take up arms and hang the traitors of this country at Syntagma square, just like the Italians did to Mussolini in 1945 (Piazza Loreto in Milan).

Dimitris’s death sparked riots in the streets of Athens as frustrated Greeks suffering under the heavy weight of austerity measures fought with police whom they accuse of being the enforcers of a fascist regime. The reference to “the collaborationist Tsolakoglou government” refers to the pro-Axis government of Georgios Tsolakoglou during the German occupation of Greece in 1941 – 1942. Chants following Dimitris Christoulas’s funeral included: “Fascists! Sons of Bitches! Here come the hangings!” When crowds descended on Syntagma Square an aggressive policeman opposing the mourners was badly beaten.

“I won’t pay.”

Renee Maltezou in ekathimerini.com writes:

Stunned Greeks asked if a flawed recipe of austerity cuts to save the country was pushing its citizens to the brink – and family and friends said that is exactly what Christoulas had hoped to accomplish.

“My father’s handwritten note leaves no room for misinterpretation. His whole life was spent as a leftist fighter, a selfless visionary,» his only daughter, Emy Christoula, 43, said in a statement.

“This final act was a conscious political act, entirely consistent with what he believed and did in his life.”

She recalled as a child attending a 1975 concert by Greek leftist composer Mikis Theodorakis, where she and her father sang together. For some dreamers, «committing suicide is not an escape but a cry of awakening», she said.

Friends and acquaintances describe Christoulas as a quiet and gentle man, but also a passionate leftist deeply shaken by the pain that the crisis had inflicted on his fellow citizens.

To many who knew him, «Makis» was a hero – a martyr who had jolted Greeks into asking whether spending and salary cuts prescribed by the foreign lenders in exchange for financial aid as Greece lurched towards bankruptcy had gone too far.

“The way he did it made the difference. It was a political act,» said 91-year old Thymios, a fellow-member of Christoulas’s neighbourhood association, who would not give his last name.

“Maybe the right thing would be to keep fighting but his act was symbolic: He went into the politicians’ ‘nest’ – parliament – and humiliated them.”

As foreign elites demand austerity in return for loans, and a compliant government bends to the wishes of those elites and enlists the security forces to enforce compliance from the public, a pensioner robbed of his pension commits a final act meant to preserve his dignity. The last book he read was Greece’s Pompeii, a comparison of Pompeii’s decadent, corrupt social system with modern Greece. Yet another stark example of the instability of inequality.

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About sdemetri
Portland, Maine freelance photographer, writer, activist

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