Bring Our War Dollars Home: Afghanistan

A recent article in Armed Forces Journal could not be clearer on the state of the war in Afghanistan. Lt. Col. Daniel L. Davis writes in Truth, lies, and Afghanistan:

I spent last year in Afghanistan, visiting and talking with U.S. troops and their Afghan partners. My duties with the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force took me into every significant area where our soldiers engage the enemy. Over the course of 12 months, I covered more than 9,000 miles and talked, traveled and patrolled with troops in Kandahar, Kunar, Ghazni, Khost, Paktika, Kunduz, Balkh, Nangarhar and other provinces.

What I saw bore no resemblance to rosy official statements by U.S. military leaders about conditions on the ground.

I came across this piece through the excellent online newsletter put out by the Afghanistan Study Group, the Afghanistan Weekly Reader. Wonkish and authoritative the ASG’s reports and news releases are non-partisan, and of the highest quality sort of analysis and information I’ve found on the subject of the decade-plus war being waged in Afghanistan.

The latest DoD request: $88 billion for the war effort in 2013 as the drawdown of troops continues. And for what, asks ASG’s Mary Kaszynski?

We’ve mentioned before that this number seems suspiciously high, considering the pace of the drawdown, We’re not the only ones who think so. At the budget briefing two weeks ago a reporter noted that the cut from last year’s war costs to this year “doesn’t seem like it’s that much of a reduction” and asked DOD officials to “give us some sense of what that’s for, that 88.4 billion?” JCS Chair General Dempsey’s response: “For recapitalization, for reconstitution, we’ve always said that it would take years following the end of the conflict to recapitalize the force.  And some of the OCO costs are caught up in that. ”

Dempsey’s answer is not that surprising. The need to “recapitalize” or “reset” the force after a decade of war is a favorite line for those who want to keep defense spending high. Trimming the defense budget, we are told, would hollow out our military forces and leave us open to all sorts of dangers.

The problem with this argument is that it’s simply not true. A new report from the Congressional Research Service says, in a typically understated way, “it can be argued that the use of the term “hollow force” is inappropriate under present circumstances.”

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About sdemetri
Portland, Maine freelance photographer, writer, activist

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